24 Hours in Tangier

On the ferry ride over to Tangier from Tarifa for a 24-hour spur of the moment trip, I found a trusted guide on the NYT that I won’t even pretend to take credit for. Below are the worthy spots we managed to explore in 1 night and several daylight hours:

1. Dar Nour – Booked this eclectically cool 10-room hotel/guesthouse on the 1-hour ferry ride over, got hustled at the ferry station (a given welcome for tourists arriving in Morocco) and made it there by 4pm for some drinks on the chill rooftop terrace, with beautiful views of Tangier and the seaside. The house feels lived in and authentic, filled with vintage furniture mixed with Moroccan pottery, rugs and art – it’s like you are staying with a cool artist friend who decorated their place with treasures and books from their many travels. The complimentary breakfast is also delicious, fresh and served in a cosy living room to make you feel right at home. Not to mention the location is perfection and the reasonable room rates make the experience that much better!

2. Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel and Restaurant – This chicly decorated hotel just down the road from Dar Nour is for those who want more of a boutique hotel experience. Their lamb tagine is beyond worthy, along with sitting in their dimly lit, cosy restaurant admiring everything from the unique lamps to the mixture of patterns on the table. During the day enjoy drinks in their casual and cool upstairs sitting rooms, or on the terrace overlooking the sea when the wind is not blowing full force.

3. Laure Welfling – Obsessed. This designer makes unique one-of-a-kind clothing and jewellery that are so reasonably priced for the quality you want to walk out with half the shop. Her husband is a ceramic artist that sells his equally cool ceramics and portraits there. Mixed between the couples’ creations is a handpicked collection of homewares and accessories to fill your souvenir quota and more. For women (they have some eclectic men’s designs too) this is a must shop-see-do!

4. Las Chicas – a fun concept store carrying a wide range of local designers’ clothing and accessories, along with vintage buttons, art and homewares all at great prices. They also have a small café for coffee or lunch upstairs if you need to take a break from roaming the Kasbah.

5. Café à l’Anglaise – This laid-back, adorable café is run by the sweetest woman who whips up fresh salads and dishes for her customers who can sit on the street, in her several cosy, colourfully decorated rooms or on the upper terrace for some morning sun. Ideal for a quick’ish quality lunch or coffee on your way to some shopping in the medina…

-Erin Bonnier

 

A Ceiling in the Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel A Ceiling in the Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel
Street in the Kasbah Street in the Kasbah
Kasbah Door Kasbah Door
Laure Welfling's Shop in the Kasbah Laure Welfling's Shop in the Kasbah
Laure Welfling's Shop in the Kasbah Laure Welfling's Shop in the Kasbah
Details from a room in Dar Nour Details from a room in Dar Nour
Moroccan Pharmacy in the Medina Moroccan Pharmacy in the Medina
The Kasbah Museum The Kasbah Museum
Rug Details from a Shop in the Medina Rug Details from a Shop in the Medina
Chandelier at Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel Chandelier at Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel
Room in the Restaurant at Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel Room in the Restaurant at Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel
View from the Rooftop Terrace at Dar Nour View from the Rooftop Terrace at Dar Nour
Rug Dancing in a Shop in the Medina Rug Dancing in a Shop in the Medina
Room Keys at Dar Nour Room Keys at Dar Nour
A Bedroom in Dar Nour A Bedroom in Dar Nour
Kasbah Door Knocker Kasbah Door Knocker
Vintage Buttons at Las Chicas Vintage Buttons at Las Chicas
Slippers at Las Chicas Slippers at Las Chicas
Wall Art at Las Chicas Wall Art at Las Chicas
Café à l’Anglaise Café à l’Anglaise
Sitting Room at Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel Sitting Room at Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel
Terrace at Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel Terrace at Nord-Pinus Tanger Hotel
Dinner Table setting at Nord-Pinus Tanger Restaurant Dinner Table setting at Nord-Pinus Tanger Restaurant

The Bowler, Derby and Bombín

After a client requested ‘bowler hat inspired’ cocktail napkins, we dove into the history of the bowler hat and were pleasantly surprised to find it’s not only for Charlie Chaplin and Sherlock Holmes…

The bowler hat was designed in 1849 by the London hat-makers Thomas and Williams Bowler for an English customer who wanted a hat to protect gamekeepers from low-hanging branches while on horseback. It replaced the previously worn top hats, which were too tall for the sport. First, popular in both the United Kingdom and America in the remaining 19th century, and later became a staple for business men in the middle and upper classes – known as “City Gents”.

In America, the hat was known as the ‘derby’ and replaced the cowboy hat for many living in the west at that time. In South America, it was known as the bombín where it was brought over to Bolivia by the British railway works. The Quechua and Aymara women in Bolivia took hold of the trend, and have been wearing them since the 1920s…by far modelling the most inspiring bowler hat fashion!

 

Traditional costumes in Bolivia Traditional costumes in Bolivia
The Son of Man, by René Magritte The Son of Man, by René Magritte
Charlie Chaplin Charlie Chaplin
The Bowery Bear at the Bowery Hotel, NYC The Bowery Bear at the Bowery Hotel, NYC
Laurel and Hardy Laurel and Hardy
John Steed John Steed
ILINKA Collection Bowler linen napkins ILINKA Collection Bowler linen napkins
John Bonham, drummer of Led Zeppelin John Bonham, drummer of Led Zeppelin
Charlie Chaplin Charlie Chaplin
Liza Minnelli in Cabaret Liza Minnelli in Cabaret
Boy George Boy George
Bolivian woman in a bombín decorated with flowers Bolivian woman in a bombín decorated with flowers
Bolivian woman Bolivian woman
Traditional costumes in Bolivia Traditional costumes in Bolivia

Thanksgiving 101

Thanksgiving

The Thanksgiving meal for an American is something we’ve grown up with from birth and each family is different. The same noodle kugel made by your grandma, and the gravy recipe from your father’s side that’s been passed down for generations. Mom makes the cranberry sauce from the can because she thinks it tastes better than the fresh. Whatever one’s traditions are they are engrained from youth and that is what makes Thanksgiving so special. Each person has their own. And the meal is so very personal and nostalgic.

For Europeans, this may be the equivalent to Christmas dinner, which is less of a thing in America – we prefer a pancake breakfast on Christmas morning in our PJs watching National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation…but that’s for another post;)

From one American to a European, we thought we’d gift you this Thanksgiving with the knowledge to possibly create your own special dish when you get the invite to one of your stateside friend’s T-giving gatherings. For the foodie, no dietary requirement types go with Jean-Georges’ ABC Kitchen recipes – always delicious winners. For those Whole [gluten + sugar + grain – free] Foodies we suggest the Helmsley sister’s take on a ‘healthier’ version…

Whatever the dish you choose may be, the most important thing on Thanksgiving is being grateful for what and who you have – and wearing loose fitting pants (very key)!!

Legendary [Holiday] Party

It’s that time of the year for a plethora of holiday gatherings – so why not throw a Legendary Party? Same old gets so same. We are gaining inspiration from Legendary Parties 1922 – 1972…stay tuned;)

Legendary Parties 1922 - 1972 Legendary Parties 1922 - 1972
Claude Lebon and Charlotte Aillaud Claude Lebon and Charlotte Aillaud
The Original Embroidered Lip Napkins The Original Embroidered Lip Napkins
LP-Checkered
LP-Dress-up
LP-Masks
LP-Carasouel-
Guests of the Marquis de Cuevas at the Goya Ball, Biarritz, 1950 Guests of the Marquis de Cuevas at the Goya Ball, Biarritz, 1950
Jacqueline Delubac with apple, etc... Jacqueline Delubac with apple, etc...

Día de Muertos

There’s something eerily beautiful about Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead); with the abundance of flowers, skull painted faces, and a plethora of candlelight. Marigolds and chrysanthemums (flowers of the dead) are used for decoration because it is believed the scent of the flowers will help guide the returning souls back home. Skulls are also an essential part of the symbolism in Mexico for the Day of the Dead – dating back to the Aztecs who believed they were a positive symbol, not only for death but also for rebirth.  Whatever the meaning is, we like it…

Vogue Japan Vogue Japan
Casa Ramirez Folk Art Shop, Houston, Texas Casa Ramirez Folk Art Shop, Houston, Texas
A Chapel door in Zincacantan, Chipas, Mexico decorated on Day of the Dead A Chapel door in Zincacantan, Chipas, Mexico decorated on Day of the Dead
Marigolds in Oaxaca, Mexico Marigolds in Oaxaca, Mexico
Vogue Italia Vogue Italia
Day-of-the-Dead-table
Vogue Italia Vogue Italia
Vogue Italia, September 2012 Vogue Italia, September 2012
Celebrating Day of the Dead, Guatemala Celebrating Day of the Dead, Guatemala
Skull Plate Skull Plate
Aizel Moscow Aizel Moscow
Flowers in San Miguel Canoa, Mexico Flowers in San Miguel Canoa, Mexico

All of the Lights

Darker days are approaching and when it comes to dinner parties linens and lighting are key. A mood board of lighting below that we are coveting at the moment…

Lindsey Adleman Lindsey Adleman
Candelabra Candelabra
Candlelight Candlelight
Ted Muehling Candlesticks Ted Muehling Candlesticks
Charles J. Weinstein Company Chandelier, 1931 Charles J. Weinstein Company Chandelier, 1931
O'lampia O'lampia
Niamh Barry Niamh Barry
Niamh Barry Niamh Barry
Page White Chandelier, 2009 Page White Chandelier, 2009
Space designed by Damien Langlois Space designed by Damien Langlois
Oscar Torlasco, 1960 Oscar Torlasco, 1960
Touch of colour Touch of colour
Space by Haka Designs Space by Haka Designs
Agnes Candelabra, Lindsey Adelman Agnes Candelabra, Lindsey Adelman

The China Club

Whether its at the Met or in the financial markets, China is a hot topic of discussion. After a friend’s recent visit to The China Club in Beijing, we felt inspired to explore the Chinese aesthetic and embroidery that makes it’s distinctive style so unique…

Dining at The China Club Beijing Dining at The China Club Beijing
Library at The China Club Beijing Library at The China Club Beijing
The China Club Beijing The China Club Beijing
Chinese Embroidery Chinese Embroidery
Dress from the Met's China: Through the Looking Glass Dress from the Met's China: Through the Looking Glass
Dining at The China Club Beijing Dining at The China Club Beijing
The China Club Beijing The China Club Beijing
Antique Chinese Silk Embroidery Antique Chinese Silk Embroidery
Chinese Silk Embroidered Waistcoat Chinese Silk Embroidered Waistcoat
Detail from The Met's China: Through the Looking Glass Detail from The Met's China: Through the Looking Glass
Chinese Needle Lace Chinese Needle Lace
Chopstick Monogrammed Cocktail Napkin Chopstick Monogrammed Cocktail Napkin
Doors at The China Club Beijing Doors at The China Club Beijing
Chinese Hand-Embroidered Silk Shawl, 1890 Chinese Hand-Embroidered Silk Shawl, 1890
The China Club Beijing Courtyard The China Club Beijing Courtyard
Vintage Chinese Embroidery Vintage Chinese Embroidery
Chinese Inspired Monogrammed Towels Chinese Inspired Monogrammed Towels
Chopstick Monogram Chopstick Monogram
Chinese 18th Century Embroidery Chinese 18th Century Embroidery
The roof of The China Club Beijing The roof of The China Club Beijing

Monogrammed Spaces

Monogramming isn’t just for linens + stationery…

Bar Luce, designed by Wes Anderson Bar Luce, designed by Wes Anderson
Wool on Burlap, 1868, American Folk Art Museum Wool on Burlap, 1868, American Folk Art Museum
Club Monaco 5th Ave Store Club Monaco 5th Ave Store
Vintage Floor Tiles Vintage Floor Tiles
Madeline Castaing Madeline Castaing
Headboard from the Marie Antoinette Film Headboard from the Marie Antoinette Film
Monogrammed Door, Argentina Monogrammed Door, Argentina
Monogrammed Luggage Table Monogrammed Luggage Table
The Gramercy Park Hotel The Gramercy Park Hotel
Versailles Gate Versailles Gate
Woven Textile, Finland, 1925 Woven Textile, Finland, 1925
Renee de Bourbon, Duchess of Lorraine left her mark on the tile of the Chapter House Renee de Bourbon, Duchess of Lorraine left her mark on the tile of the Chapter House